Prenatal supplements can affect the microbiome of breast milk

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Chehab RF et al. In the CHILD cohort study, maternal prenatal nutritional supplementation, but no nutritional pattern, is related to the composition of the breast milk microbiota. Presented at: American Society of Nutrition Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting; 7-10 June 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosure:
Chehab does not report any relevant financial information.

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Prenatal supplementation has been linked to microbial diversity in breast milk, according to results presented at the American Society of Nutrition’s annual meeting.

“Breastfeeding is the optimal form of infant nutrition with innumerable health benefits for both mother and child,” said Rana F. Chehab, RD, MPH, a research candidate at Purdue University, during a presentation at Nutrition Live Online 2021 What’s Special about Breastfeeding? It is probably the composition of the milk. ”

Data derived from: Chehab RF, et al. In the CHILD cohort study, maternal prenatal nutritional supplementation, but no nutritional pattern, is related to the composition of the breast milk microbiota. Presented at: American Society of Nutrition Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting; 7-10 June 2021 (virtual meeting).

The origin of bacteria in breast milk is controversial, according to Chehab. Possible sources include the mother’s gut microbiome, breast microbiota, infant’s mouth and mother’s skin, and sources of contamination such as a breast pump.

To learn more about the composition of breast milk, Chehab and colleagues conducted a multicenter, prospective longitudinal birth cohort study with 771 women (mean age 33 years; 57% nulliparous) who participated in the CHILD cohort study in Canada. The participants completed questionnaires about their food and nutritional supplement intake and provided milk samples. According to the researchers, the nutritional patterns of the study population were a plant-based, western and balanced diet. Of the participants, 88% took multivitamins, 18% fish oil, and 4% vitamin C during their pregnancy.

The researchers reported that prenatal supplements, but no nutritional patterns, were related to the composition of breast milk. Vitamin C supplements have been associated with higher alpha diversity and higher Veillonella frequency, but lower Stenotrophomonas frequency (P <.05). The higher relative abundance of Veillonella remained associated with vitamin C supplements after the covariates were cleared, according to the researchers. They also found that fish oil supplements were associated with lower alpha diversity (P <.05).

“We found that taking specific prenatal individual nutritional supplements, namely vitamin C, modulates the composition of the microbiota of breast milk,” said Chehab. “Future analysis is needed to explore additional associations between maternal intake and breast milk microbiome, as well as the infant intestinal microbiome and health, and to replicate these results in different cohorts in geographical locations other than Canada.”

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American Society for Nutritional Meetings and Annual Meetings

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